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Researcher Detail

Constantijn W. A. Panis
RAND

Constantijn (‘Stan’) Panis, Senior Economist, has been with RAND’s Labor and Population Program since 1992. He earned his M.A. in Economics and his J.D. in Civil Law from Groningen University in the Netherlands, and his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Southern California. His research focuses on issues in financial security and health among the elderly. His current projects include an analysis of the consequences of raising the Social Security early entitlement age and normal retirement age for retirement timing; a study to project Medicare expenditures for the next thirty years using a microsimulation model; and an analysis of the long-term consequences of pension cash-out using a dynamic programming approach. Prior projects include pension cash-out patterns among job changers in the HRS; several studies of the effects of marital status on household income, health and mortality, recognizing that income, health and mortality risks may in turn affect marital transitions; studies of valuing annuity flows if the annuity and/or survival probabilities depend on uncertain future events, such as widowhood; a look into socioeconomic differentials in the implicit returns to Social Security contributions and the distributional impact of reform proposals. Panis has enjoyed generous funding from the Social Security Administration in recent years. With Lillard, he was co-PI of MINT-II; he was PI of a project to document SSA’s master files with program data; and he is PI of a project to evaluate the effects of raising the early entitlement age and normal retirement age. Throughout his work, Panis tends to innovatively develop and apply state-of-the-art econometric techniques to account for multilevel and multiprocess models. He is the Associate Director of the RAND Center for the Study of Aging.



Associated Research Projects
 
UM01-08:  Improving Modeling Behavioral Response to Policy Change: Mircosimulation in the Presence of Heterogeneity